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20121201
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for many of those goods. the ports of los angeles and long beach, california. they are critical, because those ports handle about 39% of all the goods that arrive by ship. it came to about $200 billion worth this year. what's behind this strike? here's john blackstone in l.a. >> reporter: it began with 70 workers. now all 800 members of their union are on strike. but 10,000 other dock workers are refusing to cross the picket line. that has brought the normally busy port to a new stand still. geraldine knatz directs the port of los angeles. >> there's probably about a billion dollars worth of goods that come through this port everyday and we probably got about 900,000 or so people in the southland whose jobs are tied to the activity going through this port. >> reporter: the ports are clogged with 16 ships waiting to be unloaded. another six are anchored off the coast. >> if the ships are not working, the truckers are not working, the warehouse people are not working. it will ripple through the supply chain. >> reporter: it doesn't take much of a delay to cause problems for people. >> no.
strike by longshoremen. union leaders for nearly 15,000 dock workers at every port from texas to maine say they'll walk off the job on sunday. we asked anna werner to find out how a strike would hurt the u.s. economy. >> reporter: the port of houston handles 42 million tons of cargo every year. it extended its hours this week to try and get shipments in and out before a strike can bring the port to a standstill. jim gillis is vice president of gulf intermodal services, a container trucking company. >> we've seen a dramatic increase in volumes and congestion as a result. >> reporter: what happens if they can't get all the goods out of the port? >> you have containers being held in yards around the houston area, specifically, so you're going to see stores are going to have problems stocking. >> reporter: negotiations between the international longshoremen's union and the shipping companies are deadlocked over a proposal to cut royalties paid to 15,000 dock workers for each ton of cargo they move. a shutdown would affect 15 ports on the east and gulf coasts, including new york, baltimore,
the cliff- hanger over the nation's east and gulf coast ports, is almost over. federal mediators say dockworkers represented by the longshoremen's union and the u.s. maritime alliance are close to finalizing a new labor deal. so close, that they've extended the deadline on negotiations by another 30 days. this heads off a strike that could have begun on sunday, crippling 14 important ports. the possibility of a strike worried retailers, manufacturers, and farmers, and risked losses in the billions. >> susie: our next guest says once the fiscal cliff mess is resolved, there will be an explosion of mergers and acquisitions in 2013. he's robert profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andthat is a cause for optimism in the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at the terrible but it's been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this ye
busiest seaports. the ports of los angeles and long beach shut down after a few dozen clerical workers walked off the job and dock workers refused to cross their picket line. bill whitaker has the latest. >> reporter: 11 huge cargo ships are stuck offshore, piled high with containers of food, toys, lumber. 14 others sit untouched at the docks. >> if you guys could start handing the fliers out. >> reporter: transporters, wholesalers and retailers are growing angst. ingrid lazcano, owner of andean dream, imports quinoa, popular right now in the u.s. her last shipment was diverted to mexico, another was diverted to chile. >> we have about $400,000 worth of merchandise at stake and our factory workers in bolivia can't make new merchandise until we figure out how we're going to handle the problem with getting these two containers in. >> reporter: fred johring owns golden state express trucking. his lot, usually empty, is filled with 20 parked trucks. each usually earns $500 to $600 a day at the ports. everyday you're losing how much? >> at least $4,000. >> reporter: a day? >> per day. >> re
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4